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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
of it. >> reporter: san francisco boasts that it recycles 80% of all garbage, and is aiming for zero waste. but some skeptics don' believe it. >> brown: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnee.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> sreenivasan: a federal appeals court rejected several recess appointments made by president oba last year, saying the moves were unconstitutional. the president appointed three people to the national labor relations board last january. the president argued he was justified in doing so because the senate was a
islamist rebels in mali; zero waste in san francisco; and shields and brooks. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: president obama chose his long-time foreign policy advisor denis mcdonough to be the new white house chief of staff. mr. obama made the announcement this afternoon. he lauded mcdonough, and told him, "i know you'll always give it to me straight, as only a friend can." mcdonough will take over from jack lew, who's been nominated to replace timothy geithner as the next treasury secretary. today was geithner's last day, after four years on the job. in a final interview, he said he's hopeful the economy will strengthen this year. the defense department has begun eliminating the jobs of all 46,000 temporary civilian employees at the pentagon. the announcement today said it's a response to mandatory, across- the-board spending cuts. they're scheduled to take effect march 1, unless congress comes up with alternative cuts. without changes, hundreds of thousands of full-time civilian employees will face furloughs and reduced paychecks by april. the g
are skeptical. newshour correspondent spencer michels sat down with brown in san francisco. his report is a co-production with our colleagues at kqed-san francisco, and begins with some background on the fiscal troubles and the budget fix. >> reporter: california's sorry financial state and cuts made to health and welfare programs have prompted nearly nonstop demonstrations at the state capital in recent times. those protests got going four years ago when california and its then governor republican arnold schwarzenegger faced a staggering budget deficit of $42 billion. the recession, built-in spending, a large population in need of state services like health and welfare, a limit on property taxes, plus republican legislators' refusal to raise taxes created a dilemma in the world's ninth largest economy. with budget cuts coming like clock work, the state's college and university systems declined in offerings and in reputation. schools suffered cutbacks in personnel and programs. services for the poor were trimmed by $15 billion since 2008. state workers were furloughed. then in 2010, promising
in a san francisco bar, is taking a college course in her apartment, online, on how to reason and argue. the teacher is walter sinnott- armstrong, professor of ethics at duke university in north carolina, and the class is free. >> so how do you learn the technique? the answer is very simple. you practice, and then you practice again, and then you practice and practice and practice and practice. this class has these really short little lectures, which is great because you can kind of watch one, and then think about it and react, and then you don't have to watch another whole hour like you would in class. >> reporter: "think again" is a class presented by a one-year- old for-profit startup called coursera, currently the nation's largest provider of free online courses. 170,000 students from around the world have signed up for it. the classes are called moocs, or massive open online courses, and they may be revolutionizing higher education. online learning is nothing new. colleges have been offering classes, usually for a fee-- and for credit-- for years. more than six million americans ar
, and a ballet company. to get these -- kind of like my city, you know, help it grow up in the direction of a san francisco culturally. >> from wiz kid to celebrated icon to philanthropist. what is the secret to his success? >> the best thing is don't get attached to things have to turn out a certain way. the world just kind of flows, and whichever way it goes is right. it's just how it went. but really the keys to my happiness came about when i was about 18 to 20 years old, working it out in my hid what kind of person i would be. from then on, i had the keys to happiness, and all of this other stuff didn't matter, apples success, i would be designing need thing no, sir matter what. -- need neat things no matter what. >> before we leave you, we want to show you this interesting contraption, the digital no mad. what is this? >> it's one of the largest bicycles ever made. it was used for -- it's inventer, steve roberts, weren't around the country cycling, 17,000 miles across the country, filing stories for various magazines and journals he was writing for. >> so computer magazines, or bike magazine
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)